Tag Archives: art

S.T.E.M. is for Robots

It’s time we examine seriously, the inexorable rise of S.T.E.M., particularly in relation to the disappearance of the arts in education.

What is S.T.E.M.?

S.T.E.M. stands for Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths (or Math).

Why wouldn’t you want to promote those subjects? In fact I’d chuck in English to make S.T.E.E.M.,  as English teaches syntactic skills so necessary for programming.

S.T.E.M. is symptomatic of the weird, steam-punk Victorian-style of modern education – melding old-fashioned curricula and end of year exams with modern data-driven performance results, that are unable to quantify the long-term, intangible benefits of the arts.

Let’s face it, S.T.E.M.on it’s own is only useful for creating robots, and S.T.E.M., on it’s own, will only create robots of our future generations.

There is one big problem… we are already creating robots to replace our future generations. In ten year’s time we will have a generation brought up to do the work of robots, which is already being performed by robots.

Which humans will survive and have meaningful lives? The creative ones – the mavericks who, against all advice and without encouragement, taught themselves.

The application of S.T.E.M. relies on brilliant, creative minds. You won’t get those without S.T.E.A.M. – Science, Technology, Engineering, ART and Maths.

Art, in this case, covers all the creative subjects and activities and includes practical experimentation and failure – yes, even blowing up the chemistry lab by mistake!

Robots do repetitive tasks. Humans do creativity, it’s what they do best. They do it even better when taught the skills and are nurtured.

 

 

Did my editor like my artwork?


Did my editor like the artwork I finished for Walker – the boy who can talk to dogs?

She did, but she didn’t like the character in the image on the left. It reminded her of someone when she was young who she thought was a werewolf.

My immediate reaction was to think, “Oh yes! There the plot for book 4 in the series!”

A little though and I realised that wasn’t going to happen, so I made Mr Bonus, the Latvian village shop keeper and Walkers  business inspiration, look a little softer around the eyebrows. I think it make him look a bit like Lemmy from Motorhead!

Click the picture at the top to watch how I go about revising a piece of artwork.

I’ve since changed a few other illustrations as I noticed inconsistencies with the text as I went through the final edit with illustrations in place. Of course I should have noticed before I did the artwork!

Walker is out on the 14th of March and you can preorder the book at Amazon with the link below, so you can be the first to read it!

I was once a dedicated follower of fashion!

I’ve been working on an idea for quite some time.

It revolves around Penny and Benny. Penny is a Sophisticat Fashion Blogger and he, her partner, does stuff on the web and keeks her blog up to date – he does the photos as well.

I have a picture book I want to make about them, but I really want to establish them as a couple first. I see them more as an adult type children’s book than just for kids.

My first project is going to be a KickStarter Maker 100 project. A limited edition project exclusively done in January. It will be a book of images of Penny in 1950’s retro fashion.

I’ve been doing sketches and putting them on instagram I’ve been really brave and opened an Estsy Shop too. I put three Penny watercolour sketches up and they’ve all gone!

When I was thirteen or so, I really got into fashion and wanted to be a designer – inspired by Dior and Yves StLaurent. I even did my main history project at  Olevel on Women’s Fashion. They didn’t know what to make of it or me! I wasn’t encouraged and eventually gave in to the electric guitar and singing in a band.

But doing these fashion drawings of Penny has reawakened something very deep, and I’m loving it – maybe I’ve found my calling at last!